Predator-Free Hamilton Trust to wind up

The Predator-Free Hamilton Trust has come to the end of its useful life and is in the process of winding up. The reason is that the Central Waikato Predator Free Hub and GoEco are now filling the support role for community trapping in a much more comprehensive manner than PFH could as an entirely voluntary organisation. We are proud of the work we have done in helping get predator control under way in Hamilton and are very happy to pass the baton.
This means that the Central Waikato Predator Free Hub Facebook page is now the ‘go to’ place for all the good tips on predator control, information about predators, importance of biodiversity plus local restoration events. LIKE the Central Waikato Predator Free Hub Facebook page for inspiration, motivation and up-to-date news.

This website will remain online until August.

Waikato kaka research

Kaka are a big iconic parrot, seen most often in the Waikato in large blocks of native forest where control of stoats and possums protects nesting birds from predation. Places like Maungatautari and Pureora are great places to see kaka throughout the year, but in winter some kaka regularly visit gardens, golf courses, and small patches of forest throughout the Waikato. Kaka are known to move up to hundreds of km, so there are big questions around where they come from, and how they use the landscape throughout the year, and understanding this is important for kaka conservation. Researchers at Manaaki Whenua — Landcare Research are planning to try to start unraveling the mysteries of where these winter visitors come from, and citizen scientists can help.

If you see kaka you can record your observation on the Waikato Kaka Project on iNaturalist at https://inaturalist.nz/projects/waikato-kaka. If you are able to get a photo of the bird(s) to include in your observation, even better.

There are iNaturalist apps available to make it easy to record your kaka sightings (and all other living things). It’s also a great way to see where other people have seen kaka, so you can hopefully catch a glimpse too. Around Hamilton, I’ve seen them at Taitua Arboretum, Tills Lookout, the zoo, and the University campus.

Jesse Mulligan and other backyard trappers doing their bit

In 2015, Jesse Mulligan presented ecologist (and current PFH trustee) John Innes with an award recognising his outstanding contribution to our understanding of just how bad mammalian predators are for our native birds. Jesse was so intrigued by the subject that he invited John to talk about some of his research the next day on RNZ. Since then Jesse has become a dedicated backyard trapper, and he’s spreading the word. Keeping a rat trap or two set and baited is something most gardeners can easily do to make a real difference for New Zealand’s birds and other wildlife. See more of Jesse’s story here: https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/garden/114278760/jesse-mulligan-and-other-backyard-trappers-helping-the-predatorfree-campaign

Plant sale fundraiser

The annual Forest and Bird Waikato plant sale is on this weekend, Saturday and Sunday starting at 8am and not before. First in, first served. Bring cash.

At 88 Nixon St, Hamilton East.

Down the Right of way. Park on the road, we have trolley and wheelbarrows.

Thanks to the nurseries who have given plants: Full Bloom, Forest Flora, Growing Spectrum, Bruntwood Nursery, and Oderings.

Plant sale proceeds will go towards supporting pest animal control in Hamilton, so that biodiversity within the city can flourish. Forest and Bird are supporting the work of Predator Free Hamilton and the trap library which is being set up at Go-Eco through Predator Free 2050.

Plant sale fundraiser

The Waikato branch of Forest and Bird will be having its annual plant sale this year on the 6th of May, from 8am until midday, at 88 Nixon St, Hamilton East. As usual, there will be a great range of healthy trees, shrubs and grasses for you to select from, at good prices. There will not be EFTPOS, so please bring cash or cheque. The funds raised will continue to be put into the work of Predator-Free Hamilton.